Long Island Library Resources Council

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Media and Publisher inquiries: Email Sally Stieglitz, Communications and Outreach Coordinator, at sstieglitz@lilrc.org

RECENT BOOK AND AUTHOR EVENTS 

Upcoming Book & Author Events

    • February 02, 2022
    • 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM
    • Zoom Meeting
    Register


    Please join LILRC in welcoming David Magee, award-winning columnist and author of Dear William, A Father’s Memoir of Addiction, Recovery, Love and Loss.

    The last time David Magee saw his son alive, William told him to write their family’s story in the hopes of helping others. Days later, David found William dead from an accidental drug overdose. Magee addresses his poignant story to all those who will benefit from better understanding substance misuse so that his hard-earned wisdom can save others from the fate of his late son, William.

    With honesty and heart, Magee shares his family’s intergenerational struggle with substance abuse and mental health issues, as well as his own reckoning with family secrets—confronting the dark truth about the adoptive parents who raised him and a decades-long search for identity. He wrestles with personal substance misuse that began at a young age and, as a father, he sees destructive patterns repeat and develop within his own children. While striving to find a truly authentic voice as a writer despite authoring nearly a dozen previous books, Magee ultimately understands that William had been right and their own family’s history is the story he needs to tell. 

    About David Magee: David Magee is an award-winning columnist, author, inspirational speaker, and the Director of Institute Advancement at the University of Mississippi. He is a change-maker on alcohol and other drug wellness education and support and wellbeing. He helped inspire and create the William Magee Center for Wellness Education at the University of Mississippi, named for his late son and designed to improve lives with new solutions.

    Formerly a columnist for Newsweek, and a former daily newspaper and magazine publisher and a vice president of Alabama Media Group, David is the author of a dozen books including How Toyota Became #1, named a Top 10 Business Book of the Year from the American Library Association, and  The Education of Mr. Mayfield, a best book of the South (2009), and he has been a regular guest on CNBC.

    Source: https://www.daviddmagee.com/about

    Code of Conduct

    For questions, please email Eliscia Cirrone, ecirrone@lilrc.org.

    Professional Development Hours: 1 (.1 CEUs)

    FOR OUR PARTICIPANTS - We have implemented a two step verification process for security purposes and to maintain accurate attendance records.  You will need both a LILRC and a Zoom account. 

    If you do not already have a LILRC account you will be prompted to create one (if you have forgotten your password, and need help resetting it you can email Eliscia at ecirrone@lilrc.org).   

    If you do not already have a zoom account you will be prompted to do so upon logging into the meeting.  If this is the first time you are using Zoom, after you have created an account, you can join the meeting by entering the Meeting ID/ Password provided to you in the confirmation email.  You can access all subsequent Zoom meetings by clicking the meeting link in the confirmation email.

    • February 17, 2022
    • 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
    • Zoom Meeting
    Register

     “A firsthand, eye-opening story of a prosecutor that exposes the devastating criminal punishment system. Laura Coates bleeds for justice on the page.” —Ibram X. Kendi, National Book Award–winning author of Stamped from the Beginning and How to Be an Antiracist.

    When Laura Coates joined the Department of Justice as a prosecutor, she wanted to advocate for the most vulnerable among us. But she quickly realized that even with the best intentions, “the pursuit of justice creates injustice.”

    Through Coates’s experiences, we see that no matter how fair you try to fight, being Black, a woman, and a mother are identities often at odds in the justice system. She and her colleagues face seemingly impossible situations as they teeter between what is right and what is just.

    On the front lines of our legal system, Coates saw how Black communities are policed differently; Black cases are prosecuted differently; Black defendants are judged differently. How the court system seems to be the one place where minorities are overrepresented, an unrelenting parade of Black and Brown defendants in numbers that belie their percentage in the population and overfill American prisons. She also witnessed how others in the system either abused power or were abused by it—for example, when an undocumented witness was arrested by ICE, when a white colleague taught Coates how to unfairly interrogate a young Black defendant, or when a judge victim-blamed a young sexual assault survivor based on her courtroom attire.

    Through these revelatory and captivating scenes from the courtroom, Laura Coates explores the tension between the idealism of the law and the reality of working within the parameters of our flawed legal system, exposing the chasm between what is right and what is lawful.

    About Laura Coates:

    Laura Coates is a CNN senior legal analyst, SiriusXM host, and adjunct professor at the George Washington University School of Law. A former federal prosecutor, Coates served as Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Columbia and a Trial Attorney in the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, specializing in the enforcement of voting rights throughout the United States. As a civil rights attorney, she traveled throughout the nation supervising local and national elections and led investigations into allegations of unconstitutional voting practices. In private practice, Laura was an intellectual property litigator with an expertise in First Amendment and media law. A graduate of Princeton University’s School of Public and International Affairs, and the University of Minnesota Law School, Coates resides outside of Washington, DC, with her husband and two children.

    Source: https://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Just-Pursuit/Laura-Coates/9781982173760

    Code of Conduct

    For questions, please email Eliscia Cirrone, ecirrone@lilrc.org.

    Professional Development Hours: 1 (.1 CEUs)

    FOR OUR PARTICIPANTS - We have implemented a two step verification process for security purposes and to maintain accurate attendance records.  You will need both a LILRC and a Zoom account. 

    If you do not already have a LILRC account you will be prompted to create one (if you have forgotten your password, and need help resetting it you can email Eliscia at ecirrone@lilrc.org).   

    If you do not already have a zoom account you will be prompted to do so upon logging into the meeting.  If this is the first time you are using Zoom, after you have created an account, you can join the meeting by entering the Meeting ID/ Password provided to you in the confirmation email.  You can access all subsequent Zoom meetings by clicking the meeting link in the confirmation email.

    • March 21, 2022
    • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Zoom Meeting
    Register
    The standard story of the 19th-century movement for women’s rights is very tidy.  It has a neat origin (the 1848 convention in Seneca Falls, N.Y.) and conclusion (the passage of the 19th amendment.). This conversation will complicate both those moments in history, both by highlighting an earlier demand for woman’s rights and rethinking the kind of heroic history we tend to commemorate. It will focus on how ideas once considered “unthinkable" become common sense and how appeals to “universal" rights can obscure whose rights activists and thinkers believe actually matter.


     Lori Ginzberg is a professor of History and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies at Penn State University.  She is a historian of nineteenth-century American women with a particular interest in the intersections between intellectual and social history.  Her research has focused on the ways that ideologies about gender obscure the material and ideological realities of class, how women of different groups express political identities, and the ways that commonsense notions of American life shape, contain, and control radical ideas.  She has written several books, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton: An American Life (Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 2009) and Untidy Origins: A Story of Woman’s Rights in Antebellum New York (UNC Press, 2005).  As the nation commemorated the centennial of the 19th amendment to the Constitution in 2020, she spoke throughout the country and on podcasts and radio shows about Stanton, the foremost intellectual-activist of her generation, as well as about the conflicts and complexities involved in commemoration itself.  She has always thought librarians are heroes, but is newly grateful for their support throughout the pandemic — and so is delighted to share her work with this group.



    Code of Conduct

    For questions, please email Eliscia Cirrone, ecirrone@lilrc.org.

    Professional Development Hours: 1  (.1  CEUs)

    FOR OUR PARTICIPANTS - We have implemented a two step verification process for security purposes and to maintain accurate attendance records.  You will need both a LILRC and a Zoom account. 

    If you do not already have a LILRC account you will be prompted to create one (if you have forgotten your password, and need help resetting it you can email Eliscia at ecirrone@lilrc.org).   

    If you do not already have a zoom account you will be prompted to do so upon logging into the meeting.  If this is the first time you are using Zoom, after you have created an account, you can join the meeting by entering the Meeting ID/ Password provided to you in the confirmation email.  You can access all subsequent Zoom meetings by clicking the meeting link in the confirmation email.

Long Island Library Resources Council
627 N. Sunrise Service Road
Bellport NY, 11713
Phone: (631) 675-1570
info@lilrc.org

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